Tag: young adult fiction

Sweet Reckoning means Sweet Release from me having to read this horrifying series

Sweet Reckoning means Sweet Release from me having to read this horrifying series

☆☆☆☆☆

(0 stars)

Is ‘horrifying’ the right word? I typed ‘horrible’ at first, but then… this book, and the series as a whole, is so absurdly bad it sounds fake. How else can I discuss a book  with extreme christian themes and yet super horniness, where the bible saves the day, the love interest is a canonical child rapist, and panty-sniffing virginity-sensing demons are a key plot point?

There’s actually a fourth book, a companion to the trilogy from the viewpoint of the love interest, but right now I don’t have interest in reading it.

Continue reading “Sweet Reckoning means Sweet Release from me having to read this horrifying series”

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To Kill A Kingdom is a classic example of the Dark YA genre- that doesn’t mean it isn’t great

To Kill A Kingdom is a classic example of the Dark YA genre- that doesn’t mean it isn’t great

★★★★★

(4.5 stars)

Honestly, this book always sounded really cool- I was still quite surprised to sincerely enjoy it. I don’t know, I seem to be a cynic when it comes to YA, especially the dark sub-set- writing analysis and studying it for University likely is one reason why. I even cited this book pre-reading when discussing cover and story tropes in the genre!

Yes, To Kill A Kingdom has it all in terms of what is ‘hot’: Difficult princes, dangerous leads, a spy/murdering main character, lots of royalty, a fairytale retelling, diversity, and a slight more ‘adult’ content than used to be the norm. However, none of those things- common tropes- are necessarily bad. They are just in right now. They are probably ‘in’ for a reason.

This book offers: good writing, characters, plot, romance, morality, and leads.

Continue reading “To Kill A Kingdom is a classic example of the Dark YA genre- that doesn’t mean it isn’t great”

The sublimely vexing world of Immortal City just keeps drawing you back in for more

The sublimely vexing world of Immortal City just keeps drawing you back in for more

★★★☆☆

(3 stars)

I need to start a podcast about the worldbuilding choices in this book. Immediately.

Angels arrived 100 years ago and have lived among humanity ever since, replacing celebrities in our modern sense as the elite, beloved upper class. We’re not given a lot of information about the exact history of this, or how it went down, but I need answers.

What’s international politics like when the majority of the world’s live-in immortals live in one American city? Hey, what’s city and country politics like on that front? Are there non-angel celebrities? We’re told they showed up during the american civil war because they were upset at seeing ‘brother fighting brother’… so they just ignored all the other horrible events in human history, huh? Hey, also, shouldn’t they have been more upset about slavery? Were any of the angels not white? There’s a line about the suffragette movement- are angels sexist too?

Did WWII happen? Since angels don’t age and can only die in rare circumstances, how rapidly are angel families expanding, and do they have a backup for overpopulation/preventing incest in their bloodlines? What’s angel biology like? How come certain modern brands are listed- Versace, Gucci- but others are changed by the angels in the timeline (SaveTube, A!, Angels Weekly)? Is this timeline pollution why Blackberry phones are mentioned so often in this modern-set book?

It’s said several times angels arrived 100 years ago during the civil war, but that would put the date around 1965- are we to believe that because angels have existed, possibly stopped wars, modern tech has been invented and the story takes place then? Why the insistence on 100 years if it is essentially 150?

Is God real? Are any religions correct? How has no angel come forward and cleared that up, and how is humanity so chill about not having answers?

Considering angels take payment to protect people and save their lives (and are very specific on this with internal laws), are we to believe the angels allowed the holocaust/other atrocities to happen because the victims didn’t pay them?

THERE IS. A LOT. OF QUESTIONS.

Oh, and the rest of the book- YA teen romance- exists too, I guess.

Continue reading “The sublimely vexing world of Immortal City just keeps drawing you back in for more”

Darkest Part of the Forest is solid, but unengaging

Darkest Part of the Forest is solid, but unengaging

★★★☆☆

(3.5 stars)

This is my second foray into books about the fey, and even though Cruel Prince brought me a lot to complain about, it was for sure a lot more interesting and together than this was. While I’d say the book was good- specific flaws are hard- it felt like some things happened too quickly, others too slowly, and overall I just wasn’t that engaged.

Continue reading “Darkest Part of the Forest is solid, but unengaging”