Tag: scifi

The Kingdom: A fantastical, dystopic, nightmare

The Kingdom: A fantastical, dystopic, nightmare

★★★★★

(5 stars)

I very rarely buy physical copies of books. New, at least- one reason for my spurges of bad YA recently has been because those are the easiest books to find thrift. Good books, especially new good books, rarely show up in charity shops. However, I went ahead and paid full price for The Kingdom without reading any reviews, and I’m glad I did.

I knew I would like this, but that doesn’t mean I wasn’t pleasantly surprised how much I did. My favorite movie is Ex Machina, and one of my favorite books is Only Ever Yours, and this book is a perfect blend of both, but also set in a theme park. And books set in theme parks are the best books.

Plainly, I would recommend this book to anyone (and already have). It’s a good length suspense about the meaning of being alive, AI, morality, and advanced technologies, and the only major downside to me was the ending, which seems to set up more for a possible sequel rather than embrace a clean, tidy ending.

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Pulp Binge: The Silicon Man isn’t the real deal

Pulp Binge: The Silicon Man isn’t the real deal

★★☆☆☆

(2 stars)

THRIFT STORE WHY: The back text seemed interesting- the cover or title sure aren’t. I suppose I was expecting something a little ‘black mirror’ esque. The back text promises a ‘deep in the future people upload their brains into machines to live on forever, but must die in the real world for this to happen’.

BACK COPY LIES (what the plot really is): In a retro style future of about 2050, an FBI agent stumbles into a secret, illegal project to copy human brains into a computer. He tries to shut it down, but is murdered and put into the machine instead. There isn’t a lot to the plot beyond this, and him dying is pretty much the only plot point.

WOULD I RECC TO READ: No. It’s generally engaging, but overall a let-down that leads to a befuddling ending.

Review:

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The Similars is promising, but falls apart with one-note characters

The Similars is promising, but falls apart with one-note characters

★★★☆☆

(3 stars)

I received this book for free on Netgalley for a review. I requested it because I thought the cover was *kisses fingertips* fantastically designed, and the summary sounded like the sort of thing I’d like.

I’m struggling to write and rate this properly. I sort of skimmed reviews when I was 25% into the book, and was surprised to see most pointing out a discrepancy between the beginning and the end of the book- but having read it, I agree. The start is a solid 5 stars, and the book declines in quality around 50%, with the very end being… below average quality.

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Embers of War is a Humanist space opera with a lot to love

Embers of War is a Humanist space opera with a lot to love

★★★★★

(4.5 stars)

 

I might be a little bias because I’ve met the author and he was super nice to me and welcoming when I awkwardly sat with his table at a convention. He bought me rose as part of getting the group drinks. He’s also superbly friendly on twitter!

Anyways, I mention the bias in that I am rare to give out 5 stars, and this is more of a 4.5- but a very positive experience and score overall. I just want to be nice.

I really did enjoy this book once I got into it. Yes, it took a solid 10% or 15%, but once the plot and character introductions were through, I fully enjoyed it, and am excited for the sequel. I was really worried I wouldn’t like it, either!

The downside of me enjoying this book so much in a genre I don’t really read is that this is a pretty short and to the point review. Sorry.

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Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?

Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?

★★☆☆☆

(1.5 stars)

Ever read a book that wasn’t a book, but a philosophy class you didn’t realize you were attending? Ever read a novel that was more a script? Ever attend a philosophy class that is more reading a long script of ideas?

I’m genuinely asking. I don’t know what to do. This is not really a ‘book’ in a lot of ways.

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Pulp Binge: The Word for World Is Forest’s one strength is that I got to write a very good essay on how bad it was

Pulp Binge: The Word for World Is Forest’s one strength is that I got to write a very good essay on how bad it was

(0 stars)

☆☆☆☆☆

THRIFT STORE WHY: Assigned reading, baby! Happily, I do not own this book.

BACK COPY LIES (what the plot really is): Humans come to a planet full of big trees and green monkey people. The natives have no concept of war or hardship, and are ill-prepared when the humans begin destroying their land and enslaving their people. Our narrators are threefold: A Good Human, A Rebel Alien, and a Big Fat Racist. Despite the generic set-up, we learn along the way… maybe the REAL racist allegory was inside us (the author) all along…!

WOULD I RECC TO READ: Not on my honor or life.

Review:

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The bonkers MallWorld is a hidden sci-fi gem

The bonkers MallWorld is a hidden sci-fi gem

★★★★★

(5 stars)

I stumbled on this in a second hand book store and bought it for two dollars. My life will never be the same

Mallworld is a collection of seven short stories all taking place in the same universe, a place far in the future where everyone lives in space, and there’s a shopping mall the size of a planet. You’ve never heard of it, but it’s fantastic. Weird, dark, strange, and fun.

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