Tag: indie

Tridea’s Children is surely some attempt at psychological warfare

Tridea’s Children is surely some attempt at psychological warfare

☆☆☆☆☆

(0 stars)

This is the worst book I’ve ever read.

This book is psychological warfare. The abyss is empty, except a book club where you read this book daily and can only talk about this book. This book was made via a psychic vision of the pure pain it is to read it. This book exists purely to haunt me. This book’s existence is a puzzle personal to me. The largest moral quandary of life is how I now own a copy but cannot in good faith pass this to any charity shop. To do so would be a war crime.

Let’s take a step back.

Yes, I walked into this book knowing it would be pretty bad, and I wouldn’t like it. I also have a vague relationship with the author, though the implies we truly knew each other: rather, we were in the same year of university and shared a few classes, including a recent group project where I found him unhelpful and at one point he slagged me off in the group chat. Since this is such an indie, self published book I suspect he’ll read this at some point, so I want to apologize for any feeling of animosity here, I in no way mean this review as some attack. Yes, I saw he had a book and bought it to be a bit petty after the group project went horribly, but instead I ended up flabbergasted at the book I held in my hands.

This is the worst writing I’ve ever seen, and I’m flummoxed by any reviewer who somehow left a good comment. The writing is terrifyingly bad. The plot, character, dialogue, world, editing, ideas, and concept are equally contemptuous. There’s blatant theft of ideas from various pop culture things and somehow, zero plot narrative at all, all put together with horrible grammar and spelling mistakes abound.

There’s a lot to dissect, and there’s a reason it took me over a week to get through this tiny (190 page) book.

Continue reading “Tridea’s Children is surely some attempt at psychological warfare”

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The Book of (Boring) Angels

The Book of (Boring) Angels

★☆☆☆☆

(1.5 stars)

This is a short story collection I picked up at a convention in 2017, and put off reading for ages. I’m glad I tackled it, since I like reading small press and indie authors, but it just ain’t that good. Even for me, someone clinically obsessed with angels. Usually just angels in a book helps me like something enough to gloss over some issues. This book just ain’t that good. There’s a few ups, and the second half is Fine, but the first half is just a slog.

This is a short story collection where 58% of the stories are by the same author, and he’s also the weakest author in the book. His name is also right on the front of the book, which is a bit of a discredit to everyone else involved.

Also, when I pick up a book of angels, I want some interesting angels. The latter half has some different takes on angels (AJ sticks to biblical ish standard ones), but there’s not enough Angel Content in a book dedicated to them. I love angels because they have so much potential in media, so it was a real let down to see such uninspired takes on them.

I’ll quickly go over each story in the bunch.

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Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?

Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?

★★☆☆☆

(1.5 stars)

Ever read a book that wasn’t a book, but a philosophy class you didn’t realize you were attending? Ever read a novel that was more a script? Ever attend a philosophy class that is more reading a long script of ideas?

I’m genuinely asking. I don’t know what to do. This is not really a ‘book’ in a lot of ways.

Continue reading “Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?”

Pulp binge: Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon is a cozy, comfortable book about weird times, good friends, and bad puns

Pulp binge: Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon is a cozy, comfortable book about weird times, good friends, and bad puns

★★★★★

(5 stars)

THRIFT STORE WHY: I found the cover for another book in the series (“lady slings the booze”) and was ENRAPTURED for months. I’ll post the cover below the cut, but basically: a woman stands at the bar, next to a german shepard who is sitting at the bar, wearing a suit and tie with sunglasses. Sherlock Holmes is jumping over a lamp, a robot is in the foreground, and nothing makes sense. When I found the full set for sale months later, I knew I had to read the series.

BACK COPY LIES (what the plot really is): This section is called this as pulp is often vague or misleading about the plot, but yeah: this one is pretty straightforward. Callahan’s is a bar where anything can happen, and anyone can stop by with a story to tell. Aliens, time travelers, mutants, psychics… everyone is welcome, everyone has something to say.

WOULD I RECC TO READ: There’s one or two bits that have either not aged well or are too heavy handed, but overall, very much!

Review:

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Dusk in Kalevia is a very solid, very obscure book

Dusk in Kalevia is a very solid, very obscure book

★★★★☆

(3.5 stars)

I need to get a disclaimer up here right now: The cover of this book possibly my favorite of all time. There’s several wonderful illustrations within, but I picked this book up and read it purely for the cover. It is aesthetically perfect to me- character art, design wise… This thing is not what I expect from a small indie press in the slightest and it is wonderful.

Oh, and the other reason I bought it is because it’s about angel spies in the cold war.

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Beacon is a fun, disjointed episodic adventure… until it’s not

Beacon is a fun, disjointed episodic adventure… until it’s not

★★★☆☆

(3 stars)

I don’t know quite how I feel about this. Quick review. I got an ARC for free from the author.

The short of it is this: it’s short. It’s a novella, and feels shorter than one (on my e-reader it was about 100 pages). The story itself is entirely episodic, and contains 4 short adventures. The writing flows generally well and is upbeat, ‘quirky’ and kinda funny (YMMV, it didn’t appeal to me much but was easy to read) (think like percy jackson ‘jokes and fun’ type tone).

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What is 27 hours but the poorly written garbage heap of the pander-tastic soul?

What is 27 hours but the poorly written garbage heap of the pander-tastic soul?

☆☆☆☆☆

(0 stars)

This grade is entirely based on the book, overlooking (most) of the colonialist controversy and all of the author-sex-abuse stuff. It’s just a shite book.

But the above is why I’m dropping it early. I meant to write a sick-ass takedown of what was a painful read, but it’s kind of relevant if it’s being taken out of print, fans are turning against it, the series is cancelled and the author has been disavowed. Kind of makes my deep literary critique pointless.

If the allegations end up false and she’s brought back to honor, maybe I’ll finish the book. I’m using this as an excuse not to.

Continue reading “What is 27 hours but the poorly written garbage heap of the pander-tastic soul?”