Tag: dystopia

Only Ever Yours is an incredible modern, yet classical dystopia

Only Ever Yours is an incredible modern, yet classical dystopia

★★★★★

(5 stars)

I read this on the floor of a train station during a ten-hour train delay, finishing around 2am, and it was probably the perfect experience for this book. Strange, long, complicated, at times mysterious and frustrating, Only Ever Yours brought perfectly together Brave New World and 1984- but with a more direct commentary on feminism, the role of women in society, sexuality, and media. (While also having time to talk about racism, eating disorders, sex, sexism, social inoculation, brainwashing, and mental illness).

And listen, folks, I’m not a pretentious person. You won’t catch me dead giving a holler about women’s studies or queer theory. But Only Ever Yours is not some highbrow, academic commentary. It’s a solid story in an extreme dystopia, where the world has shaped the characters perfectly, and the reader never quite knows enough.

Continue reading “Only Ever Yours is an incredible modern, yet classical dystopia”

Advertisements
Relic: The next big YA dystopia you’ve never heard of (because it flopped, hard)

Relic: The next big YA dystopia you’ve never heard of (because it flopped, hard)

☆☆☆☆☆

(0 stars)

The dystopia craze of the early 2010s brought forth an incredible wave of roughly the same plot line: an average white girl (often with brown hair, which she tends to tie back) finds she’s not so average after all, and then must contend with two love interests in a paper-thin world that just doesn’t understand her problems. Hunger Games was a good book series, but the vast majority that followed were not. Many felt like cash grabs towards the current hot genre.

Relic, by Heather Terrell, feels entirely constructed. Somehow I refuse to believe she put any soul into it, ever labored on the manuscript in dreams of one day publishing this dear pet project. To be frank, it is a disaster of a YA novel, so cliché it feels like clever satire. Described as Game of Thrones meets The Hunger Games, this book is neither of them.

Continue reading “Relic: The next big YA dystopia you’ve never heard of (because it flopped, hard)”