Tag: dystopia

The Fandom is a brutal, meta take on YA dystopia

The Fandom is a brutal, meta take on YA dystopia

★★★★☆

(4 stars)

Hey, funny! I didn’t realize when I started this, but this is a good companion piece to my last review on the Manic Pixie Boy Improvement Project. Both are meta focused YA fantasies, but The Fandom is far superior. I picked this up thrift not expecting anything, but once I started reading I couldn’t put it down.

A girl and her friends accidentally end up in the world of their favorite book. Violet, her brother, and her best friend Alice know every word to the movie, every scene from the book, every detail and every thing about The Gallows Dance. When they find themselves in the world of The Gallows Dance, they find it is just… horrible, and must find a way to escape before they end up dead. Not helping matters is that they accidentally killed the heroic main character, putting the breaks on canon.

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Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?

Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?

★★☆☆☆

(1.5 stars)

Ever read a book that wasn’t a book, but a philosophy class you didn’t realize you were attending? Ever read a novel that was more a script? Ever attend a philosophy class that is more reading a long script of ideas?

I’m genuinely asking. I don’t know what to do. This is not really a ‘book’ in a lot of ways.

Continue reading “Aw jeez, who invited ‘lecture disguised as a book’ Genesis to the dinner table?”

Pulp Binge: High-Rise climbs high, and descends further

Pulp Binge: High-Rise climbs high, and descends further

★★★★☆

(3.5 stars)

THRIFT STORE WHY: I had only vague, vague memories of high-rise, but the name and concept were familiar. The cover sure isn’t much (my copy is different, but still a very boring image of a high-rise… where’s the glam, guys?).

BACK COPY LIES (what the plot really is): In a luxury high-rise, tensions between floors- a divide essentially between the rich, richer, and richest- devolve slowly into warfare… and continue to devolve from there. Three narrators, from three of the tiers, experience this change in the building and themselves.

WOULD I RECC TO READ: While it’s not a wonderful book to read, it is a good one- and unfortunately, the movie sucks, so this is really your only way of experiencing it.

Review:

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Fallen Host takes an okay series and makes it phenomenal

Fallen Host takes an okay series and makes it phenomenal

★★★★★

(5 stars)

Book 2 in a series. Here’s book 1, Archangel Protocol.

I picked up the first book because it was 3$ and looked silly, and it turned out okay. I do love angels, though, so I went ahead and bought the second book since it was in stock.

Really, really glad I did. This book is 100% better than the first, and just stunningly good… compared to the last, but it is also quite good in general. While I was reading, I kept telling everyone about how stunned I was at the quality.

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Guðsríki’s strengths cannot overcome its weaknesses

Guðsríki’s strengths cannot overcome its weaknesses

★★☆☆☆

(2.5 stars)

(This is about book 3 in a series. Book 1, Valhalla, can be found here. And Book 2, Ragnarök can be found here.)

Three stars is my go to for hard to place books. So, welcome Gu… Guðsríki… Welcome to book Hell.

I had a lot, lot of problems with this book. All of Ari’s ticks in the last books that I could overlook came back in full force, leading to a very long (and very negative review). Buckle in.

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Only Ever Yours is an incredible modern, yet classical dystopia

Only Ever Yours is an incredible modern, yet classical dystopia

★★★★★

(5 stars)

I read this on the floor of a train station during a ten-hour train delay, finishing around 2am, and it was probably the perfect experience for this book. Strange, long, complicated, at times mysterious and frustrating, Only Ever Yours brought perfectly together Brave New World and 1984- but with a more direct commentary on feminism, the role of women in society, sexuality, and media. (While also having time to talk about racism, eating disorders, sex, sexism, social inoculation, brainwashing, and mental illness).

And listen, folks, I’m not a pretentious person. You won’t catch me dead giving a holler about women’s studies or queer theory. But Only Ever Yours is not some highbrow, academic commentary. It’s a solid story in an extreme dystopia, where the world has shaped the characters perfectly, and the reader never quite knows enough.

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Relic: The next big YA dystopia you’ve never heard of (because it flopped, hard)

Relic: The next big YA dystopia you’ve never heard of (because it flopped, hard)

☆☆☆☆☆

(0 stars)

The dystopia craze of the early 2010s brought forth an incredible wave of roughly the same plot line: an average white girl (often with brown hair, which she tends to tie back) finds she’s not so average after all, and then must contend with two love interests in a paper-thin world that just doesn’t understand her problems. Hunger Games was a good book series, but the vast majority that followed were not. Many felt like cash grabs towards the current hot genre.

Relic, by Heather Terrell, feels entirely constructed. Somehow I refuse to believe she put any soul into it, ever labored on the manuscript in dreams of one day publishing this dear pet project. To be frank, it is a disaster of a YA novel, so cliché it feels like clever satire. Described as Game of Thrones meets The Hunger Games, this book is neither of them.

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