Tag: angel

In a past life, maybe Rapture was an okay standalone novel

In a past life, maybe Rapture was an okay standalone novel

★★☆☆☆

(2 stars)

Rapture actually has a lot of things going for it: lovely descriptions, vivid images of international locations, interesting angel lore, neat magical concepts, and a few raised and slightly discussed deeper themes. The problem is that all of these positives are beaten over the head with the fact this is book four, and the final book in a quartet, of an extremely uneven series.

The Fallen quartet is perhaps the most diverse series I’ve read in that every book is decidedly a different genre and story-type to the next, as if the author had a checklist of things she wanted to try and decided to use the same paper thin characters to act each one out.

So, while I enjoyed some aspects of this too-long book, it was always hampered down by the fact it was the last book, and thus needed to provide a conclusion and tie-in to the ones before it. The treasure hunt for ancient angelic relics to solve a mystery about the fall is a fine idea and easily could have been the plot of a different, better novel, which didn’t also have to weave in a whole ton of characters, revelations, and confusing reincarnation gimmicks in as well.

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Fallen is a puzzling, prime example of poor YA

Fallen is a puzzling, prime example of poor YA

★☆☆☆☆

(.5 stars)

If you’re new to this blog, or need a reminder, I’m drawn to the following in books:

  1. Angels/Demons
  2. YA from around the early 2010s at the height of the paranormal boom
  3. Bad YA (from around that era, quite often)

I’d actually, however, avoided picking up Fallen for a long time. It’s really, really easy to find in thrift shops and even libraries, and ticks all of the above boxes. However, I never grabbed it because… well, I’d already read it back in 2012. I hit it down as ‘DNF’ because it was boring. I think I got 100 pages in, but on reading the full thing here, I couldn’t tell you where I last stopped- the first 100 pages of this book is exactly the same as the next 350 pages, and it all blends together in a cacophony of bad.

I read it this time in two sittings while at work because I’m an adult now, but this is an extremely frustrating book to contend with. The supernatural revelation takes place 77% through the book, and even then the reader gets very few answers on anything that happened. This is a thick book of absolutely nothing but school life, and I wouldn’t even be able to parse some of the ‘lore’ and ‘story’ if not for the really bad movie made from this which somehow does a far better job delivering exposition.

Continue reading “Fallen is a puzzling, prime example of poor YA”

Sweet Reckoning means Sweet Release from me having to read this horrifying series

Sweet Reckoning means Sweet Release from me having to read this horrifying series

☆☆☆☆☆

(0 stars)

Is ‘horrifying’ the right word? I typed ‘horrible’ at first, but then… this book, and the series as a whole, is so absurdly bad it sounds fake. How else can I discuss a book  with extreme christian themes and yet super horniness, where the bible saves the day, the love interest is a canonical child rapist, and panty-sniffing virginity-sensing demons are a key plot point?

There’s actually a fourth book, a companion to the trilogy from the viewpoint of the love interest, but right now I don’t have interest in reading it.

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Sweet Peril is not sweet and has no peril

Sweet Peril is not sweet and has no peril

☆☆☆☆☆ (0 stars)

Look, middle book trilogy stump is a thing, and it was especially defined as a thing thanks to the trilogy era of YA, first seen in the paranormal romance boom. Book one, they meet… book three is the final battle… What is book two?

Well, this book two is sort of like a short story collection with an overlapping cast. There’s no plot arc or drive to this book at all, which is frankly astonishing. There’s at least eight chapters (a large chunk of the book) which are loosely connected time jumps where our main character, Anna, goes to another country/state for a purpose, achieves it, and leaves.

We’re operating on levels of sheer non-plot structure that would blow anyone’s mind.

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Sweet Evil is a chaotic, inexplicable mess

Sweet Evil is a chaotic, inexplicable mess

☆☆☆☆☆ (0 stars)

Ooowee!!! You have to imagine me making that sound as I think about this. I just finished this book, and this is all coming in hot. There’s a lot to say about this- the increasingly and incredibly Christian themes, the insane hypocritical nature of the horniness in this story, the sexism, the premise, whatever Kopano was, Kaiden’s participation in crimes against humanity….

Oh yeah. You thought this was a generic para-ro about a good girl falling for a bad boy and they’re both half-fallen-angels? You’re right! And then the next 60% of the book happen, because pacing and story structure is off the rails here. There ARE no rails on the coaster of Sweet Evil.

Let me be your conductor.

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Unearthly could use a few more angels

Unearthly could use a few more angels

★★☆☆☆

(2 stars)

Oh, you know me by now: I love angels, and I read books about angels, and they pretty much always let me down in one way or another. That way being, primarily, a real lack of luster angels. Unearthly is an honest step above a lot of the angel genre, especially for an early 2010s para-ro piece, but like a lot of that era (and the YA genre), it spends too much time on teen problems, not angels. And I’m here for the angels.

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The sublimely vexing world of Immortal City just keeps drawing you back in for more

The sublimely vexing world of Immortal City just keeps drawing you back in for more

★★★☆☆

(3 stars)

I need to start a podcast about the worldbuilding choices in this book. Immediately.

Angels arrived 100 years ago and have lived among humanity ever since, replacing celebrities in our modern sense as the elite, beloved upper class. We’re not given a lot of information about the exact history of this, or how it went down, but I need answers.

What’s international politics like when the majority of the world’s live-in immortals live in one American city? Hey, what’s city and country politics like on that front? Are there non-angel celebrities? We’re told they showed up during the american civil war because they were upset at seeing ‘brother fighting brother’… so they just ignored all the other horrible events in human history, huh? Hey, also, shouldn’t they have been more upset about slavery? Were any of the angels not white? There’s a line about the suffragette movement- are angels sexist too?

Did WWII happen? Since angels don’t age and can only die in rare circumstances, how rapidly are angel families expanding, and do they have a backup for overpopulation/preventing incest in their bloodlines? What’s angel biology like? How come certain modern brands are listed- Versace, Gucci- but others are changed by the angels in the timeline (SaveTube, A!, Angels Weekly)? Is this timeline pollution why Blackberry phones are mentioned so often in this modern-set book?

It’s said several times angels arrived 100 years ago during the civil war, but that would put the date around 1965- are we to believe that because angels have existed, possibly stopped wars, modern tech has been invented and the story takes place then? Why the insistence on 100 years if it is essentially 150?

Is God real? Are any religions correct? How has no angel come forward and cleared that up, and how is humanity so chill about not having answers?

Considering angels take payment to protect people and save their lives (and are very specific on this with internal laws), are we to believe the angels allowed the holocaust/other atrocities to happen because the victims didn’t pay them?

THERE IS. A LOT. OF QUESTIONS.

Oh, and the rest of the book- YA teen romance- exists too, I guess.

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